Facts and Myths about Depression

30 Jan 2020 #Depression

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We have heard a lot of stories about people in our family or close friend circle, where they are being described as someone who has lost his/her mind or is mental and is deemed as a burden to the society. The issue here is depression has been a part of human life since ages but it was only recently given a term scientifically and deemed an illness. One of the articles I read recently said “The earliest written accounts of what is now known as depression appeared in the second millennium B.C. in Mesopotamia. In these writings, depression was discussed as a spiritual rather than a physical condition. Like other mental illnesses, it was believed to be caused by demonic possession. As such, it was dealt with by priests rather than physicians.”

There are many myths surrounding this illness and I am going to hit you with some facts about the same.

Myth 1: It’s not a real illness

Fact: Depression is a serious medical condition and the top cause of disability in adults. Biological evidence of the illness comes from studies of genetics, hormones, nerve cell receptors, and brain functioning. Nerve circuits in brain areas that regulate mood appear to function abnormally in depression.

Myth 2: Men don’t get depressed

Fact:A depressed man, his loved ones, and even his  doctor may not recognize depression. That's because men are less likely than women to talk about their feelings. Instead, men may be irritable, angry, or restless. They may even lash out at others. Some men try to cope with depression through reckless behavior, drinking, or drugs.

Myth 3: Only cure is taking medicine for life 

Fact: Asking for help doesn't necessarily mean your doctor will advise medications, although medicines can often be very helpful for significant forms of depression. 

Studies suggest, though, that "talk" therapy works as well as drugs for mild to moderate depression. But it is not necessary you would have to take them for life.

-By Shruti L